Rubber-coated ballast demonstrates improved track resilience - myLargescale.com > Community > Forums


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Old 10-02-2019, 05:38 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Rubber-coated ballast demonstrates improved track resilience

So, who is going to be first to try this in G scale?
https://www.railjournal.com/in_depth...ack-resilience

Rubber-coated ballast demonstrates improved track resilience
Quote:
With railways seeking to cut maintenance costs and preserve their assets, the search for new innovative ways to minimise the adverse effects of failures associated with ballast aggregate on heavy-haul lines has intensified.

Comsa, Spain, developed Neoballast in collaboration with Mapei, Spanish infrasturcture manager Adif, and the Polytechnic University of Catalonia in 2011 with the goal of potentially doubling the lifespan of conventional ballast and improving noise and vibration behaviour. Tests of the product are now underway as part of the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research initiative.

The Neoballast aggregate consists of conventional ballast stone coated with synthetic elastomers generated from recycled motor vehicle tyres with the aid of a binder. The new ballast is designed to reduce the rate of degradation and settlement of the ballast layer and also to reduce maintenance interventions and costs.
That "triaxial shear test" sounds interesting: what kind of measuring devices would have been used?
I'm guessing from the words that they were measuring ballast displacement and forces on 3 axes.
Quote:
Preliminary tests to determine the mechanical performance of Neoballast were conducted by the consortium at the University of Granada, Spain, using a triaxial shear test on a track used by passenger trains. Cyclic dynamic load tests ranging from 5kN to 65kN were conducted, which is equivalent to 20-tonne axleloads at a frequency of 5Hz.
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Old 10-02-2019, 01:11 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Forrest;

While I don't like to "rain on somebody else's parade," I have learned from personal experience that the laws of physics don't always scale down very well. In the past, I used "starter" size granite chicken grit for ballast. When mixed three parts chicken grit to one part dry mortar mix, it remained fairly stable, once misted in place with a garden hose.

Coating the chicken grit with rubber would be another challenge. I suspect that even a very well thinned rubber cement would still be too "gummy." You would have to create a means for breaking the chicken grit apart once the rubber cement dried. OR I suppose one could (1) have the track laid and wired in. (2) Add and profile the ballast. (3) Then spray the thinned rubber cement over the ballasted track, AFTER applying masking tape to the rail heads. Battery and live steam folks could probably skip the masking tape and enjoy better tractive effort as a bonus.

Anyway, it would provide an interesting experiment in large scale.

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Old 10-03-2019, 06:30 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Seems like a good idea. Landscape companies now sell rubber mulch, although a bit big for G-scale. Maybe chop it further in a blender?
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Old 10-03-2019, 09:44 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Well, scale size ballast would probably work if we had scale sized rain, and only scale sized animals and wind speed scaled down to 1:20 or 1:29
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Old 10-03-2019, 11:30 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Elmassian View Post
Well, scale size ballast would probably work if we had scale sized rain, and only scale sized animals and wind speed scaled down to 1:20 or 1:29
I wonder if it would also require scale gravity.
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Old 10-06-2019, 01:17 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Tires are toxic. Worn out ties are toxic. Ground up tires (for children's playgrounds and used to make artificial turf and mulch, etc.) is toxic. If the ground up tires give off particles or dust, or chemicals that can be absorbed or breathed it's toxic. and you will be affected if you mess with it - and not in a good way.

Roads made of recycled tires and rubber coated ballast will leach harmful chemicals into drain water which will permeate the ground and groundwater, and flow into rivers, lakes and the ocean contaminating them.

Moral; you can't take something toxic and repurpose it without its original toxicity continuing with it in whatever form. Caveat: unless extreme and often very expensive measures are taken to alleviate or mitigate the toxicity. Miracles are possible but as in life extremely rare.

Just something to think about.
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Old 10-11-2019, 05:09 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Chris, can you list the toxic chemicals that are coming from the tires and in what quantities and their ill effects? Would be more informative than just some general statements.

Doug
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Old 10-11-2019, 09:13 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Doug;

Just a guess, but I suspect that unless the tire rubber is subjected to intense heat, the bad stuff stays in the rubber. A few years ago I bought a ramp, called "Bridgit," to ease our autos over the combination curb/gutter in our development and onto our driveway. It is made from recycled tires, but did not come with chemical warnings. (And I have no intentions of subjecting it to a torch.)

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Old 10-11-2019, 11:46 AM   #9 (permalink)
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I read up a bit, and dust from grinding/sanding the stuff seems to be universally bad.


But, looking at dangerous stuff leaching from the rubber seems to be some brands/processes, while others don't have an issue.


I've read some reports that allude to what Chris says, and others that do not find issues.


So universal damnation does not seem proper at this point, but if you were to sprinkle it on your corn flake would require further investigation.


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Old 10-11-2019, 07:21 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwr71 View Post
Chris, can you list the toxic chemicals that are coming from the tires and in what quantities and their ill effects? Would be more informative than just some general statements.

Doug
Styrene-butadiene or styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) describe families of synthetic rubbers derived from styrene and butadiene

It is also known as styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The chemical styrene is toxic to the lungs, liver, and brain. Synthetic additives are added to achieve stabilization. Often however, synthetic latex can be made of combinations of polyurethane and natural latex, or a combination of 70% natural latex and 30% SBR



That's 5 min via Google; "chemical composition of tires"
Hope that helps with your future curiosity and internet searches
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