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Old 07-02-2020, 09:12 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Thanks Stan
Russell
The standoffs are trial and error. Without them the burn usually goes to the end of the burner the standoffs block some of that and diverts the flow backwards. they don't go all of the way to the bottom of the ceramic plate but about 75% of that. Usually at least 1/2" of space is required under the plate for correct mixture and distribution but in the front sides over the wheels there is only 1/8" but the center channel provides enough access to those spaces.
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Old 07-02-2020, 09:50 AM   #12 (permalink)
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There is a diverter/extension on the stack that is in the stored position in every photo i have seen. It looks like it was held in place with two bolts that would be loosened to raise it and could be removed to reposition it to point left or right. Mine will do the same thing.




The extension was made from sections of pipe welded together to get the bend. I turned my pipe from 3/4" bar stock. To cut it into wedge shaped sections, I first turn a wood dowel to a tight fit inside to keep it from getting bent when I cut it and then using a spacer to set the angle, I cut them on the table saw.


They are then silver soldered one by one to make the unit.


And the finished product is laid next to the photo of the real one.
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Old 07-04-2020, 09:33 AM   #13 (permalink)
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The boiler wrap transitions to an upside down wagon top boiler design.
To support it, I am using a ring and wedges. i start by cutting the ring out of plywood


I then taper it on the belt sander and glue it and the wedges on


Then the front sheet is cut and bent and Fiberfrax is attached to the boiler


Supports are made for the firebox. The left side is notched for the lower sight glass tube




Finally the two rear sheets are cut drilled out and bent to shape. They are all soldered with Staybrite and imperfections are filled with JB Weld. The backhead is finished off also.




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Old 07-04-2020, 12:46 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Nice job on the wrapper. I can't quite tell from your boiler photos if the fire box has dry legs. Is that why the lower pipe to the water gauge runs forward past the fire box?
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Old 07-04-2020, 06:22 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Yes Winn, the dry leg firebox works best on ceramic burners as it allows for more tubes and a bigger crown sheet. I have tried both and the dry out performs the wet.
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Old 07-17-2020, 08:02 PM   #16 (permalink)
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I received the wheels from Walsall last week. Here is a photo of the rough and the finished casting


I start by mounting the wheels in the external jaws of the lathe and drill out the axle hole and face off the back till I expose the spokes.


I then mount it in my arbor and face off the front to 6mm wide and do the tread profile to .020" over the final dimension




I then go back to the external jaws and face the hub off to 1/4"
On Dennis' lathe we do the tread profile with a plunge tool.
Finally, I attach the counterweights with JB Weld and paint them.


The feedwater is a little more difficult than one might think. I first start with a frame made from two curved pieces Dennis cut on the CNC mill. the inner one has three tabs for mounting on the firebox front.
The two bottom pieces are notched out for alignment and the two short pieces are to keep it square.




The coverings are cut from 1/32" stock and annealed. The inner one is notched out for the tabs to clear and the assembly is silver soldered together.
The coverings were made a bit oversize to be sanded flush.


Because this is a simple engine, superheated steam will go from the rear engine to the front. A manifold is made at the rear engine and a dog bone connection will provide the swiveling and telescoping junction between the two chassis.




I want to keep the steam as hot as I can so I insulate the 5/32" copper tubing with string which has been impregnated with Carborundum glue and painted with bar-b-que paint


The next photo shows the connections between the chassis.
The upper pipe is the rear engine exhaust.
In the middle connection, you can see the dog bone and to the right the insulated tube to the front engine.
The bottom tube is the steam supply coming from the smokebox
Just below the dogbone, you can see a rod with a yoke on the right. This is the reversing lever.
To the left of the cylinders it looks like the rod passes under a bar spanning the frame rails but it is actually going through a hole in it keeping it in line with the rear frame and controlling the bend in the rod to jibe with the front chassis articulation.


The two chassis mounting heights are determined by the weight the boiler distributed on them. Simple Mallets are notorious for front chassis spin so I moved the center mount back a bit to put more weight on the front. I will measure again when all of the accessories and water is added and can shim some to get the best balance at that time.
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Old 07-26-2020, 05:17 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Great project Bill. Those engines really intrigued me since I saw a photo of one from K. Zimmermann's book on the Milwaukee electrics. Its funny that none are seen in the film Danger Lights its all Mikados. The Milwaukee was a great fallen flag.
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Old 07-26-2020, 10:44 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by du-bousquetaire View Post
Its funny that none are seen in the film Danger Lights its all Mikados. The Milwaukee was a great fallen flag.
Simon,

That would largely have to do with the time and location of the filming of Danger Lights. It was filmed Largely in Miles City, MT and in a few other locations around the MT area (Sixteen Mile Canyon) along with Chicago, IL of course.

Timing is the other factor. Danger Lights is a 1930 film, largely filmed in 1929, the year the N3 rebuilds started. It is likely not many of them were either complete or working in the area of Miles City at the time of filming.

Like their original designs, the N3's were found in both regular service and pusher duty on the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Lines; even after the electrification of the mainline of the from Tacoma to Othello, WA (hence the stack deflector, for the numerous tunnels along the Pacific extension).

They could be found running on the Elk River branch and the entirety of the non-electrified section of the Pacific Extension in Idaho. Another area where they saw use was the Everett Branch in WA, on the Coast Division.
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Old 07-27-2020, 10:48 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Ryan
It amazes me how you know so much about every line and loco.

I am taking a week off from building and am in Lake Tahoe with the family (16 of us)
Went to Virginia City Yesterday and rode the V&TRR from there to Gold Hill and back
The engine was a standard gauge consolidation. Not sure if they ever ran one of those in the day but it was fun. My son said they were all taking in the scenery and deer & mustangs when he looked over at me and was studying the rivets on the tender
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Old 08-08-2020, 05:49 PM   #20 (permalink)
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The sand domes are different. The front one is low and wide and the rear narrower but higher.
On the front one, I start by cutting out a wood block to shape and then wrap a piece of card stock around it
I cut the approximate boiler curve on the bottom and then set it in place. Then using a pencil held firmly on it's side, I mark the final cut.




I remove the card stock and use it as a template glued to the brass sheet with spray adhesive


I cut the top to shape and silver solder the dome together


The rear dome top is 3/16" thick as it will be rounded off after assembly. I get the shape by setting the compass to 1/2 the width and making two center pops which are separated by the same measurement as the length minus the width.


The side is done the same way as the front one.The top is rounded off with the 1" belt sander after soldering.


Finally the running boards, air tanks and cooling piping with the rt side tank being the lubricator, bell, generator, clack valves and piping, water heater piping and hand rails are added
The large pipes on the side were the rear engine exhaust which is where the water heater picked up it's heating steam.

Next up cab, safeties, and tender





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