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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-29-2020 10:20 PM
Aflyer
Quote:
Originally Posted by East Broad Top View Post
"Need" and "want" are two different things. On a loop that small, you can easily get away with one or maybe two feed points. And you will likely not have much or any problems for a while. Fast forward three or four years, though, and the joints oxidize, moisture does its thing, dirt works its way in. More feed points mitigate the effects of this.

If you're in the process of laying your track, it's no more work to run feeders alongside the track as you're laying it and run feeders to the rails every 10 - 25' or so depending on how long your rail sections are. (Longer rail sections have fewer joiners, hence need fewer feed points.) This way they're there, in the ground, and doing their job as opposed to having to go back 5 years down the line once the landscaping has matured and add wires.

Wire's inexpensive, the extra work out of the gate is minimal, and it means far less stressful running down the line. Since we do the hobby to escape stress, it's definitely worth it.

Later,

K
K,
I use that phrase all the time, especially when I am buying trains, LOL.
I can add a couple extra feeder wires, as you said it is much easier now than later. But if it is to overcome failures in the joints, I will work harder to clean them and pack them would a good conductive grease.
Thank you,
George
06-29-2020 05:51 PM
East Broad Top "Need" and "want" are two different things. On a loop that small, you can easily get away with one or maybe two feed points. And you will likely not have much or any problems for a while. Fast forward three or four years, though, and the joints oxidize, moisture does its thing, dirt works its way in. More feed points mitigate the effects of this.

If you're in the process of laying your track, it's no more work to run feeders alongside the track as you're laying it and run feeders to the rails every 10 - 25' or so depending on how long your rail sections are. (Longer rail sections have fewer joiners, hence need fewer feed points.) This way they're there, in the ground, and doing their job as opposed to having to go back 5 years down the line once the landscaping has matured and add wires.

Wire's inexpensive, the extra work out of the gate is minimal, and it means far less stressful running down the line. Since we do the hobby to escape stress, it's definitely worth it.

Later,

K
06-28-2020 09:00 AM
Aflyer
Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieB View Post
Hi and welcome to the forum from another Carolinian. Our longest loop is 237 feet with two feeder connections. Other than joiner issues we've never had problems with having good power around the track.
SophieB,
Thank you for the welcome. I have received positive responses on a single set of track feeders, so that is what I have done.

Got the loop roughed in yesterday and ran ran a loco around for several minutes, and I have not even cleaned some to the track sections yet.

Thanks again,
Aflyer
06-28-2020 05:29 AM
SophieB
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aflyer View Post
Hello all, and thank you for making joining this forum so easy.

If I go DC transformer power how many feeders needed for 90' of track...
Aflyer
Hi and welcome to the forum from another Carolinian. Our longest loop is 237 feet with two feeder connections. Other than joiner issues we've never had problems with having good power around the track.
06-21-2020 06:59 PM
Aflyer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Thornton View Post
In a recent discussion, it was pointed out that brass track is more conductive that regular copper house wire, due to the large cross-section. So the answer is you probably should only need a single feed point.

However, in real life, your track isn't one big solid piece of brass - it has connectors at the joints which get old and dirty. The recommendation was to (a) clean the joints as you lay the track and use lots of conductive grease [auto-supply store] then (b) clamp the rail joints securely. Some folk solder a jumper wire across the joint and don't bother to clamp, which reduces track expansion issues, but still needs lots of careful work. If you clamp, find a way to allow expansion/contraction.

Incidentally, I use a site-specific google to find this stuff, like: "site:mylargescale.com DC track feeders"
https://forums.mylargescale.com/29-b...ons-rails.html

This thread on LSC started about cleaning track, but on p2 it goes into wiring issues.
http://www.largescalecentral.com/for...u-clean?page=1

Finally, I do recommend the PVC ladder roadbed. It's easy to make and easy to adjust of necessary. You can even bury it and cover it with ballast.
Pete,
Thank you for the response and good infocmatiopnm. Don't know how I missed your reply. I have some track locks, and experimenting with putting 1 screw in short tracks and 2 in the 4 ft sections, I am sure this is going to be a learning experience.

Aflyer
06-20-2020 10:07 AM
Aflyer Good morning all,
I bought a bunch of PVC boards from Lowes yesterday they are 5/8 X 1.5 to build my ladder sub roadbed.
I attached the spacer blocks to one side, the outside of the tightest, 5' curve that I will have on my loop.
Bending it to follow the right curve and attach track didn't work out so well, so this morning I am off to buy a sheet of plywood for making a bending jig.

My question is this: somewhere on this forum I found a great write up on how to build the ladder using PVC 2X4's. I can't find that write up this morning, can you help me find it, or another instructional post?
Thank you,
Aflyer
06-19-2020 12:10 PM
Aflyer
Quote:
Originally Posted by marwen View Post
Welcome to the Forum! There is a wealth of experience on composite repair on here.
marwen,
Thank you, I agree there is a wealth of information here, I can't read fast enough.
I do think I have read enough to go buy some PVC and try my hand at building my first ladder sub roadbed.
George
06-19-2020 12:10 PM
Pete Thornton
Quote:
General questions are:
If I go DC transformer power how many feeders needed for 90' of track. If I go with battery power who makes decent but not killer expensive.
In a recent discussion, it was pointed out that brass track is more conductive that regular copper house wire, due to the large cross-section. So the answer is you probably should only need a single feed point.

However, in real life, your track isn't one big solid piece of brass - it has connectors at the joints which get old and dirty. The recommendation was to (a) clean the joints as you lay the track and use lots of conductive grease [auto-supply store] then (b) clamp the rail joints securely. Some folk solder a jumper wire across the joint and don't bother to clamp, which reduces track expansion issues, but still needs lots of careful work. If you clamp, find a way to allow expansion/contraction.

Incidentally, I use a site-specific google to find this stuff, like: "site:mylargescale.com DC track feeders"
https://forums.mylargescale.com/29-b...ons-rails.html

This thread on LSC started about cleaning track, but on p2 it goes into wiring issues.
http://www.largescalecentral.com/for...u-clean?page=1

Finally, I do recommend the PVC ladder roadbed. It's easy to make and easy to adjust of necessary. You can even bury it and cover it with ballast.
06-19-2020 12:02 PM
Aflyer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Meashey View Post
George;

I had American Flyer S gauge trains for over 20 years. I'm afraid that I was one of those horrible people who kitbashed and weathered Flyer. None of my photos were electronic or done with an SLR camera, so I cannot post them here (unless I can find and scan them). Had a lot of fun with my Flyers, but that was over 42 years ago now.

Today I kitbash and modify large scale. For DC power supplies, you will probably be in good shape by simply running a second set of feeder wires to the farthest point from your initial set of feeders. The main thing is making sure you have good track joiners. I had track outside for about eight years with few problems, given I had only the ordinary rail joiners and no clamps. My simple oval had about 90 feet of track. As always, depending on climate, your results may differ. My layout was in southwest Virginia.

Best wishes, David Meashey
David,
Thank you for the message. I am not a rivet counter, so kit bashing and weathering S gauge is good with me. We both know "S" is there "S"superior gauge, LOL.

Pics would be nice if you find them. I can't do URL's or pics on this site yet, but if you want to check out what I do over there, search for ACSG Carolinas Division and look at member railroads and show pictures. Actually I need to post some updated photos of my layout, those are pretty old.

About 90' is what I expect top end up with outside in G, 2 feeders sounds good to me. I have about 80' double track on my S layout and ran a buss with feeders every 3', I now think that was way overkill.
George
06-18-2020 08:47 PM
Dave Meashey George;

I had American Flyer S gauge trains for over 20 years. I'm afraid that I was one of those horrible people who kitbashed and weathered Flyer. None of my photos were electronic or done with an SLR camera, so I cannot post them here (unless I can find and scan them). Had a lot of fun with my Flyers, but that was over 42 years ago now.

Today I kitbash and modify large scale. For DC power supplies, you will probably be in good shape by simply running a second set of feeder wires to the farthest point from your initial set of feeders. The main thing is making sure you have good track joiners. I had track outside for about eight years with few problems, given I had only the ordinary rail joiners and no clamps. My simple oval had about 90 feet of track. As always, depending on climate, your results may differ. My layout was in southwest Virginia.

Best wishes, David Meashey
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